Tag Archives: Qi

All about the yarrow.

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Is It All Me?

Today’s 1-hr neigong sitting was monumentally difficult. Although I felt the white light vibrations grow from within and seep into me from without, I was a bit too attached to my monkey ass mind. But it was my first 1-hr sitting since my qigong workshop a few weeks ago, so I wasn’t so hard on myself. Actually, I’ve grown to rarely be hard on myself. In cultivation practice just like anything else, you’ll always have “good” days and “bad” days. Continue reading

Sitting in Oblivion to Blow Up the Outside World

 

Almost twenty years ago, I was suffering from one of the lowest points of my life. I was an undergrad at the time, but the downward spiral of anger and depression that I was going through were so debilitating that I would spend days on end at home, not wanting to go outside, not wanting to see or speak to any of my friends (or whatever friends I had left). I held myself hostage inside of my apartment that I treated like a turtle shell, inside of which I hid. The only energy I had was just enough to sleep, smoke cigarettes, and listen to the radio. At the time, it was the mid-90’s and alternative/grunge was my savior. Continue reading

On exercise.

I have no goals when I exercise. I’m only in the moment.

Fitness isn’t a goal, it’s an action. It’s what you do. To me, coming from a Taoist standpoint, the act of exercise is in itself fitness. It also goes much deeper than how you look. Continue reading

Knowing

My qigong master once said, “When we practice our qigong, we realize the brilliance of our own intuitive knowledge. But if we don’t practice, we not only forget what we know, but we forget that we knew.”

About a month ago, one of my former classmates from acupuncture college came into my office for a treatment. It’s been years since I’ve seen her, but that day she stopped for a second and said that I looked like a “monk.” I was pretty flattered because I knew that she meant that I have the appearance of someone who cultivates every single day. Being a person who cultivates as well, she could read that in me. And it’s not because I have a bald head and wear beads on my wrist. I guess I have a “look.” But I’m not going for a look. Continue reading

Cultivation of Stillness

Here’s an excerpt from an esoteric classic of Taoist scripture of which I will remain nameless for absolutely no reason at all, but enjoy:

“During the twelve double-hours of the day,
Constantly seek clarity and stillness.
The numinous tower of the heart emptied of all things:
This is called clarity.
Not allowing even a single thought to arise:
This is called stillness.

The body is the dwelling place of qi.
The heart is the residence of the spirit.
When intent moves, spirit is agitated;
When spirit is agitated, qi is dispersed.

When the intent is stable, spirit remains fixed;
When spirit remains fixed; qi gathers.
The perfect qi of the Five Phases
Then gathers together and forms a pinch of elixir.”

It’s interesting to note that even though my studies in medical qigong and Taoist priesthood seemingly come from a vastly different place, through this scripture, the intent is exactly the same.

My Taoist Practice

There’s so many lineages and practices that one can choose from in order to consider themselves “Taoist.” They can be one or any combination of many practices and philosophies involving martial arts, energy work, spiritual work, philosophical work. Actually, you really don’t need any of it, or maybe just one of them, to consider yourself Taoist because Taoism means the study of the “way” or “path,” and many times it means that it’s the practice and realization of the way the universe works in order for you to live in harmony with it for a better life. You can actually call yourself “Taoist” by just understanding the basic principles of Yin/Yang and Wu-Wei, and building from there. Continue reading